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THE MISKATONIC INSTITUTE OF HORROR STUDIES – LONDON UNVEILS SPRING 2017 LINEUP AND NEW SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

After successfully closing out the fall season with author Maura McHugh’s class investigating codes and signs in David Lynch’s TWIN PEAKS: FIRE WALK WITH ME (complete with complimentary doughnuts!), The Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies – London returns to the Horse Hospital from January-May 2017 for another semester of film classes on a range of […]

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“Nature Found Them Guilty”: Revenge in Australian Exploitation Cinema

Thu. Jan. 19, 2017

This lecture will explore how Australian horror cinema of this period incorporates a subversive streak that critiques Australian history and culture through the theme of revenge. This lecture will explore how Australian horror cinema of the 1970s and 80s incorporates a subversive streak that critiques Australian history and culture through the theme of revenge.

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Lost Treasures of Japanese Genre Filmmaking

Thu. Feb. 16, 2017

In this illustrated talk Jasper Sharp will explore the out reaches of Japanese fantasy cinema, from the embryonic trick films of “The Father of Japanese Film” Shozo Makino through oddball homegrown sub-genres such as the prewar “ghost cat” (bakeneko or kaibyô) films and the ama cycle of sexy pearl diver films, some long-lost Japanese takes on the movie monsters of Universal Studios, the pink film-horror of directors like Tetsuji Takechi and Kinya Ogawa and much, much more, all peppered with a liberal amount of clips of some truly bizarre titles that remain either unseen or unseeable to modern audiences outside of the country.

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Synthetic Flesh/Rotten Blood: The Turn to Gruesomeness in American Horror Films, 1931-1936

Thu. Mar. 16, 2017

Taking a fresh look at the genre from 1931 through 1936, this class examines ‘happy ending’ horror in relation to industry practices and censorship. Early works like Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) and The Raven (1935) may be more akin to the modern Grand Guignol of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) and Hostel (2005) than many critics believe. Tracing the development of classic horror to the deployment — and subsequent censorship — of on-screen ‘gruesomeness’, Jon Towlson will illustrate the discussion with memos, letters and censorship reports from the studio archives and other research conducted for his new book, The Turn to Gruesomeness in American Horror Films, 1931-1936.

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Tele-terrors: The Real and Imagined Horrors Inside the Made for Television Movie

Thu. Apr. 20, 2017

Often considered the bastard step-child of the theatrical motion picture, TV movies have long been relegated to the dusty corners of our childhood memories. However, despite its scorned status, telefilms could be thoughtful and, at times, subversive. This lecture offers an exploration into several facets of the made for television movie, surveying its cultural touchstones and analyzing the influence the telefilm had on Americans during the run of the network made for television movie produced between 1964 – 1999.